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1 milyar içerik beğenisine ulaşan National Geographic’in öne çıkan 12 fotoğraf paylaşımı

1 milyar içerik beğenisine ulaşan National Geographic’in öne çıkan 12 fotoğraf paylaşımı

National Geographic, dergi kültürü sonrasında Y Kuşağı ile sosyal medyada, özellikle de Instagram’da buluştu ve şu anda 19 milyon takipçi seviyesine ulaştı.

Yalnızca etkili fotoğrafların yer aldığı Instagram sayfası şu anda 19 milyonun üzerinde takipçiye sahip. Bir dergi ile yoluna başlayan National Geographic’in bu geniş takipçi kitlesi ünlü kişilerin hesaplarını saymazsak, en nüfuzlu hesapların başında geliyor.

Bu instagram hesabı şu ana kadar yaklaşık 7000 fotoğraf paylaştı ve bu paylaşılan fotoğrafların like sayısı 1 milyar beğeniyi aştı. Bu arada National Geographic hesabının inanılmaz derecede genç kullanıcılardan oluştuğunu da belirtelim. Takipçilerin neredeyse %70’i Amerika’nın dışında çeşitli ülkelerden sayfayı takip ediyor. Yine bu takipçilerin yaklaşık %75’ini ise, Y Kuşağı gençleri oluşturuyor.

National Geographic’in resmi hesabı dışında iki farklı Instagram hesabı daha var. Instagram’da kullanıcıların fotoğraf merakının artmasını öngörerek, yalnızca kullanıcıların çektiği fotoğraflara yer verdikleri hesap olan natgeoyourshot  ve yine kullanıcı foroğraflarından yola çıkılan ve maceraperestlere daha yakın olan natgeoadventure bulunmakta.

Şimdi bu hesabın “nasıl çekilmiş” diyebileceğiniz birkaç paylaşımına da göz atalım:

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Photo by @BrianSkerry A Gray Seal folds its flippers and poses underwater in the Gulf of Maine. Extending from Cape Cod to Nova Scotia, the Gulf of Maine and its surrounding waters have been the economic bedrock of New England’s coastal communities, supporting a wide variety of commercial and recreational activities. Unfortunately, many factors currently threaten the vitality of the Gulf of Maine ecosystem today. Decades of pollution of our marine waterways, coastal habitat destruction, overfishing and bottom trawling have wrought havoc in the form of extensive habitat loss and diminished biodiversity. Restoring health to these important resources as rapidly as possible is an imperative. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #newenglandoceanodyssey #gulfofmaine #maine #nikonambassador #seals

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Photo by @BrianSkerry A newly hatched leatheback sea turtle scrambles towards the ocean, about to experience saltwater for the first time in Trinidad. Only about 1 in 1000 hatchlings will make it to adulthood due to predators. But nature has compensated for this and female leatherbacks have multiple clutches of hundreds of babies. What these animals cannot overcome are the anthropogenic stresses, such as getting caught in fishing gear, poaching and climate change and as a result have struggled to survive. Leatherbacks never stop swimming once in the sea; they remain in perpetual motion. Their lineage dates back more than 100 million years, older than dinosaurs. @thephotosociety @natgeocreative #seaturtles #trinidad #babyanimals #endangered #nikonambassador

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Photograph by @JohnStanmeyer Mount Bromo (foreground) and Mount Semeru, simultaneously erupting as the earliest touches of dawn mix with the light from a setting full moon during the sacred #Kasada ceremony in the spectacular #Tengger Caldera located in #EastJava #Indonesia. Pleased to announce that beginning today I’ve joined @NatGeoCreative for representation in commercial assignments and image licensing. In addition, I’m bringing my entire archive — 14 stories from more than a decade with @NatGeo magazine — over to NatGeo Creative, expanding my collaboration with the Society, sharing more loudly the passions for education, awareness on the issues facing all of us today and into the future. Looking forward to dancing with the talented team lead by Maura Mulvihill and the likes of @alicebrkeating, @ginamartindc and more. Above is a photograph from my 4th story with the magazine, published in the January 2008 edition, titled #VolcanoGods. A story I proposed to the magazine, the approach was rather unorthodox — not how one volcano is interacted with #spiritually, rather how an entire nation located along the #RingofFire interacts with what many Indonesian’s believe are the bellybuttons of the earth. Will never forget the story proposal conference call. It went somewhat like this: Mid-morning in a bar in Iquitos, Peru. On the phone was editor and chief, Chris Johns, then director of photography @dlgriffin, creative director @billmarr, members of the editorial and art departments, maps and more. After explaining the story approach for 10 or so minutes, Chris said, “I like this idea, let’s do it.” Then I thought, great — now I have to prove my theories on a topic never widely studied. Had the privilege to be partner with Senior Photo Editor, @sadiequarrier. Sadie and I worked through the process of creating the final narrative that appeared in the magazine. Often complex, I’ve always feel that each National Geographic story I do is like preparing — then defending — your doctoral thesis. In this case, it nearly was, standing in a room over a year later, presenting the final story that originated with a "let’s do it" back in South America.

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Photograph by @paulnicklen // Emperor Penguins court one another as they prepare to feed their hungry chick. I spent 6 weeks camping on the sea ice with these 70 pound, 40 inch tall penguins. The truly exciting part of this story was how they released millions of micro-bubbles from their feathers to reduce friction against the water, ultimately doubling their in-water speeds to avoid leopard seal predation. Please follow me on @paulnicklen to see this incredible physiological adaptation in action. I am so excited to share stories from the field this coming week on May 17, 18 and 19th ( 3 evenings and two matinees) at the Benaroya Hall in Seattle for NG LIVE. Definitely one of my favorite audiences in one of my favorite venues. Apparently it is sold out (nothing to do me and everything to do with NG's great relationship with this enthusiastic city) but I hope to see you there regardless. http://events.nationalgeographic.com/…/seattle-speaker-ser…/

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Image by @beverlyjoubert. A playful little lion cub clings to a termite hill. Sadly the number of lions has fallen drastically over the last 50 years from around 100 000 to only 20 000 today. Together with National Geographic, Beverly Joubert and Dereck Joubert founded the Big Cats Initiative to raise awareness and implement change to the dire situation facing big cats. Since 2010 the BCI has funded more than $2 Million in support of 73 projects in 25 countries. There are numerous stresses facing these species but initiatives like this will help to reverse the decline of our big cats, and this little cub and others like him will be better able to thrive in their environments – wild and free. #lions #bigcats #BCI #BigCatsInitiative #conservation

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